Species Found at Whetstone Park

White Snakeroot

CC: 3

Wingstem

CC: 5

Great Blue Lobelia

CC: 3

PawPaw

CC: 6

Jumpseed

CC: 3

Woodland Sunflower

CC: 4

Black Walnut

CC: 5

Canada Goldenrod

CC:1

American basswood

CC: 6

New York Ironweed

CC: 3

Eastern lined Aster

CC: 3

Blue wood Aster

CC: 4

Sycamore

CC: 7

Mockernut Hickory

CC: 6

Pin Oak

CC: 5

Red Maple

CC: 2

Sugarberry

CC: 5

Eastern Cottonwood

CC: 3

Red Oak

CC: 6

Frost Grape

CC: 3

 

Floristic Quality Assessment Value: 18.55

 

 

 

Lowest CC Values

Canada Goldenrod

CC:1

Canada Goldenrods are very common throughout Ohio. It is an herbaceous perennial seen in almost every county in Ohio.

Red Maple

CC: 2

The Red Maple is seen relatively often throughout Ohio. However, it is regarded as a poor timber species due to its susceptibility to disease and defects. They also grow relatively rapidly.

White Snakeroot

CC: 3

White snakeroot plants are toxic and can be poisonous to horses. However, white snakeroot is a pretty common plant throughout Ohio, leading to its lower CC rating.

Great Blue Lobelia

CC: 3

The Great Blue Lobelia can live in moist to wet soils. It is also a common plant seen throughout Ohio, leading to its lower rating.

 

 

Highest CC Values

Sycamore

CC: 7

The Sycamore has the highest CC value of the plants that I found. It is a very massive tree, and it is the most massive in the eastern half of the U.S. defined by its circumference. They are typically found on the banks of streams. Due to this impressive feat, I believe it earned its high rating.

PawPaw

CC: 6

The PawPaw grows naturally in moist and shady places. It has the largest edible wild fruit native to the United States. Due to it being the most abundant wild fruit, I believe it earned a higher rating.

American basswood

CC: 6

American basswoods have a narrow range of ecological tolerances, living in only moist, rich, and well-drained soil. They also only grow in circumneutral soil. Furthermore, they’re also known as a bee tree because their flowers are very attractive to bees and cause them to make a strong-flavored honey.

Mockernut Hickory

CC: 6

Mockernut hickory provides very high quality lumber used for many fuel wood products. Mockernuts are also a very important food source for wildlife, especially squirrels.

Invasive Species

Black Alder

Black Alder is a widespread invasive plant. It is a short-lived species that lives in low-lying damp areas. Alder wood is typically used for particle board. (Linked here)

Amur Honeysuckle

 

Amur Honeysuckle was present all over my park site. It is an extremely invasive species in Ohio. It was imported as an ornamental plant in New York in 1898. (Linked here)

Common Boxwood

The Common Boxwood is an invasive shrub that was seen near the entrance of the Park of Roses. Boxwood is used typically for ornamental bushes. (Linked here)

Common Mugwort

The Common Mugwort is an invasive shrub seen at Whetstone Park. The Mugwort seed has previously been used as a medicinal herb. It was thought to have been first introduced to North America in the 16th century by Jesuit missionaries. (Linked here)

 

Substrate Associated Species

Common Hackberry

Typically grown in soil that is rich in limestone.

Redbud

Grown in limestone heavy areas.

Hawthorn

Plant typically found in limestone filled areas.

Eastern Hemlock

Although this plant is typically found in more sandstone filled areas of Ohio, and does not really fit in with the other plants I found, this one was located near the Park of Roses entrance.

Overall, my plants seemed to fit in with what I expected. I found the top three close to the Olentangy River edge, and they all enjoy living in limy soil.